Enterprise iPad Marketshare Update

Eric Carlson | August 28, 2011 | Mobile Strategy

As an organization we don’t get pulled into too many conversations about iOS and Android enterprise marketshare.  It’s important, of course. It’s important to know the trends of where consumer buyers are spending as typically that’s a leading indicator as to how enterprise buyers will follow. Or to our “Consumerization of IT” discussion, it’s also an indicator of what devices IT may need to support moving forward.

What’s far more interesting to us is understanding the proliferation of the iPad marketshare and other tablet devices throughout organizations. We’re interested to see which organizations have a defined corporate strategy for bringing tablets to their users, as well as the amount of devices that are BYOD devices being used within the enterprise.

Finding statistics that outline enterprise tablet sales and usage has been non-trivial.  One indicator that has been useful is Good Technology’s Device Activation report. This report is generated quarterly and provides statistics on new devices that are licensed on Good’s product stack. It’s not a rock solid indicator, but it is a representative product that’s available for both iOS and Android that would typically be used by larger enterprise customers.

Which brings me to some statistics that I missed in my first review of Good’s report for Q2:

Tablet adoption continued to grow over Q2 with tablets averaging 27 percent of all device activations, driven by substantial adoption of the iPad 2. In fact, there were more activations of the iPad over the quarter than all Android smartphones and tablets combined.  Motorola Xoom was the most popular Android tablet and the Motorola Droid 2 Global was the most highly activated Android smartphone.

Wait, what?

Together iPad2 and iPad activations outnumbered all Android device activations as Good customers heavily deployed the iPad 2 tablet to their workforces in Q2 after its initial release in March.

Remember these are not depicting shipments, sales, or any other purchasing channel metric, but purely the number of devices that are being “brought into” the enterprise and being licensed on Good’s email and /or management technology stack.  Even so, the fact that the iPad has accounted for 27% of all Good Technology device activations in the quarter is incredible.  Combined with the statistic that all iOS devices are driving 75% of the activations at Good, and it’s safe to say that iOS is beginning to build a strong foothold in the enterprise. While the percentage of these devices that are being purchased by organizations for employees vs. the amount that are being brought in through employees is unknown, those that still believe the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) model will subside should take a good look at the full report.

Activations by Industry

Another area that is difficult to build some metrics around is industry use of the iPad. Good comes through again with a great data point:

GoodTechQ2iPadIndustry
This backs up other sources of information we’ve received and seems to pass the common sense test. Typical first mover industries in technology are well represented here (Pharmaceuticals, Healthcare, and Financial Services) and a low cost “consumption” device like the iPad requires a small amount of investment to play around with to discover the possibilities. The large spike in Financial Services is a little surprising, but we’re assuming a large portion of this is BYOD related.

So What?

Some will say that this tablet push is a temporary phenomenon. Some will say these numbers will change dramatically once Honeycomb begins to proliferate more, or once Ice Cream Sandwich is released. Some others will say that these are all “+1” devices so who cares anyway?

What we believe is that these devices are accretive to the enterprise – not just for personal ‘mobility’ use as outlined here in this Good report, but as a device able to change the way organizations interact with their customers. Is this report the bellwether to how the enterprise will look 1, 5, or 10 years from now? We think it may be. So the question is, now what? Can we take this new opportunity and transform it into something special – something that will elevate this device from a “BYOD +1” into something that can translate into real business value?

Talk to us to learn more about discussions we’re having with our customers today, and what future we’re looking to bring to these devices. I would love to hear your comments, so leave one here or find me on twitter at @ericjohncarlson.

Eric Carlson

Eric is a seasoned leader with a keen eye for emerging technologies. He is well respected in both technical and business circles, due to his ability to match up the right amount of technology "geekiness" with business understanding to craft truly unique solutions. As a seasoned executive, with startups through successful exits to his name, Eric has the experience to advise companies on the discipline and objective approaches that are needed to turn ideas into reality. Eric can be reached at eric.carlson@propelics.com or on twitter at @ericjohncarlson.

More Posts

Follow Me:
TwitterLinkedInGoogle Plus